Clothing With Character: Brooks in BooksBrooks Brothers clothing is woven throughout the American literary landscape. The company’s clothes were featured in novels such as F. Scott FitzGerald’s debut, This Side of Paradise; Joseph Heller’s Catch-22; and, surprisingly, William Burroughs’ Junkie. Mary McCarthy’s popular story title said it all: “The Man in the Brooks Brothers Shirt.”

Carly Heitlinger


Fashion Blogger

Caitlin Lindquist wasn’t always the boldly feminine blogger behind the fashion, beauty, and travel site Dash of Darling. Before she was scouting new shoot locations and thoughtfully curating looks with her signature style and sense of humor—last year, she channeled a modern-day pilgrim in honor of Thanksgiving—Lindquist was a beleaguered law-school student searching for a creative outlet in between late-night cramming sessions and hours-long class lectures. By the time she graduated, she knew she had found her passion and, leaving her hard-earned degree behind, she took the remarkable leap into blogging as a full-time career. “One of the best things about blogging is that you never know what is coming next. I love seeking out new adventures and finding new opportunities. No day is ever the same and I think that is what first drew me to this path.” That, perhaps, and an auspicious trip to a Brooks Brothers store one cold, dark winter’s afternoon …

“It was a frigid Saturday, in the late afternoon, when I decided to venture out to Newbury Street with a friend to help him uncover his personal style. No easy task, but what else is there to do in the middle of a snowy Boston winter? We trudged along through the bitter cold, and as soon as we came upon the Brooks Brothers store, shining in the fading winter sunlight, I knew we had found the perfect place. We walked through the front doors and immediately were met by tables of neatly folded dress shirts gleaming with timeless, American style. The store smelled like a rich blend of wood and leather and a hint of spice—a warm and cozy welcome from the icy Boston winter weather. Along the wall, sweaters hung in a row—classically casual pieces that had a dash of modern, formal appeal. The first thing I pulled off the rack for my friend was a camel-colored wool blazer. Looking back, getting his first, real blazer was a big turning point in his sartorial life. And I could tell he felt good in it because as he was totally checking himself out in the mirror, squinting his eyes and giving his reflection a satisfied up and down. How could you blame the guy? The blazer fit like a glove and also reflected something he didn’t even know, at the time that he was searching for: a sense of cultivation, character, and contemporary style.

Once we had gathered a significant pile of wool pullovers, impeccably pressed non-iron shirts, and another perfectly cut blazer, I knew it was safe to move on to shopping for myself. After perusing the racks and shelves, I made a beeline for the classic white oxford shirts. Few shirts age better than a Brooks Brothers oxford, which made it a great item to add to my wardrobe: the poplin stretch cotton was super comfortable and the slim cut defined my waist, making for the perfect fit. A few flannel button-downs, midi skirts, and pullovers later, I discovered something I’ve come to love about Brooks Brothers: it’s always struck that magical balance between high-quality, traditional clothing and a modern style and suits my youthful attitude—perfect for the young, post-grad professional I was then and the on-the-go lifestyle blogger I am now.

Needless to say, that visit to Brooks Brothers was wildly successful and helped two people define their personal style: his, a combination of comfort and classic cuts; and mine, ladylike with a touch of the unexpected. Perhaps the biggest takeaway from our style adventures was a fashion maxim I refer to almost every day: ‘love what you wear and wear what you love, and no one can tell you you’re wrong.’”

—Caitlin Lindquist

Caitlin Lindquist


Founder, Dash of Darling

Randy P. Seitz


President, CEO, Penn-Northwest Development Corporation

—Randy P. Seitz

Matt McGorry


Actor

Brooks Brothers Repp-resent: Ties That Reverse TraditionWell before the twentieth century, British gentry sported silk ties featuring stripes running left to right (or heart to sword), which indicated the wearer’s club, school or regiment. In 1902, Brooks Brothers cheekily produced Repp ties with the stripes running right to left—creating an instant classic that has been a staple in American men’s wardrobes ever since.