Carly Heitlinger


occupation

Fashion Blogger

location

Fairfield, CT


“I have a vision of my daughter one day discovering this sweater, packed away over time, and wanting to wear it.”

“I used to longingly flip through the Brooks Brothers fall catalog that arrived on our Florida doorstep, wrinkled from humidity. We were on the mailing list because my dad loved the dress shirts, but very often I was the one who flipped through the pages first. I remember staring at the neatly stacked shirts—smartly paired with colorful ties. I’d dog-ear pages and circle products that I wanted for back to school: wide wale corduroy skirts, wool dresses with wooden buttons, and every sweater I could find. While my classmates and I spent the year in shift dresses, polo dresses and shorts, I dreamed of the day I could wear a sweater, a corduroy skirt or a wool dress (if I was lucky); and maybe there would be one day in late November when it was cool enough to do so.

I found myself “up north” in Washington, D.C. for college and couldn’t wait for back to school shopping. I would finally fulfill my desire for tweeds and wools and corduroys. The first place I found myself was the Brooks Brothers in Georgetown. I bought many sweaters throughout my four years in school, but it was a colorful Fair Isle Brooks Brothers sweater that I loved the most. I still wear it as often as possible, it reminds me of walking through campus on those crisp fall days just as the leaves began to change. Even now, I have a vision of my daughter one day discovering this sweater, packed away over time, and wanting to wear it. That’s what Brooks Brothers means to me—timeless style and quality—a tradition passed down through generations.”

Woolgathering: The Golden Fleece Becomes a Trademark—In 1850, the company adopts its now-iconic logo, which has served as a symbol of fine wool and integrity since French duke Phillip the Good chose it to represent his knights of the Order of the Golden Fleece. The emblem was subsequently used by wool merchants throughout Europe; H.S. Brooks wanted an association with English tailoring.